Tuesday, 18 January 2022 00:00

An ankle fracture refers to a broken ankle bone. Fractures can be a partial or a complete break in one or more of the bones in the ankle. Symptoms of a broken ankle include pain at the site of the fracture, swelling, bruising, blistering over the fracture site, difficulty walking or bearing weight on the affected foot, and ankle deformity. In a severe, open fracture, the broken bone can poke through the skin and lead to infection if not treated immediately. Fractures are usually diagnosed through a physical examination and X-rays or bone scans. Treatment for the fracture will depend on its severity but may include resting, icing, compressing, and elevating the ankle, immobilizing it in a cast or splint, taking pain medications, or undergoing surgery. If you suspect that you may have broken your ankle, please seek the care of a chiropodist as soon as possible.  

Ankle fractures are serious injuries that require medical attention. If you have broken your ankle, please consult with Paul A. Scotti, D.Ch from West Toronto Foot & Ankle Clinic Inc. . Our chiropodist can help you maintain the health of your lower limbs and your mobility.

Symptoms

  • Pain at the site of the fracture

  • Swelling

  • Bruising

  • Blisters

  • Inability to walk

  • Ankle deformity

  • In the case of an open fracture, bone protruding through the skin

Diagnosis

  • Physical examination

  • Medical history

  • X-ray, bone scan, or other imaging study

Treatments

  • Rest

  • Ice

  • Compression

  • Elevation

  • Immobilization

  • Pain medications

  • Surgery

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Broken Ankles
Monday, 17 January 2022 00:00

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Tuesday, 11 January 2022 00:00

Working in a standing position all day can cause a variety of foot problems. A combination of working on your feet for prolonged periods of time, standing on hard floors, and wearing poorly fitted shoes can cause foot conditions such as calluses, corns, flat feet, blisters, and sprains. Existing foot conditions, such as arthritis, may also be worsened by these factors. To prevent foot ailments related to working on your feet, it is essential to wear comfortable and supportive shoes and socks. If possible, sit down during break times. You can also stretch the calf muscles, feet, and ankles while you work to reduce strain. If you work in a standing position and are experiencing foot and ankle issues, a chiropodist can treat your condition and offer strategies to prevent foot problems in the future.  

If you stand all day, you may be at an increased risk of developing various foot conditions. If you are experiencing foot pain of any kind, please consult with Paul A. Scotti, D.Ch from West Toronto Foot & Ankle Clinic Inc. . Our chiropodist will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment. 

What Foot Problems Are Caused by Standing?

Standing all day at work may increase your risk of developing foot or ankle problems.

Some common foot conditions that may arise from spending all day on your feet include: 

  • Foot pain

  • Blisters

  • Corns and calluses

  • Arthritis

  • Flat feet

  • Bunions

  • Sprains 

  • Athlete’s foot

Prevention

If you stand for prolonged periods of time for work, taking preventative measures to preserve the health of your feet is strongly recommended. 

Measures you can implement to help prevent foot problems include: 

  • Wearing shoes that are comfortable and fit well - these shoes should be made of breathable materials and provide you with arch support and cushioning. It is best to avoid shoes that have heels or narrow toe boxes.

  • Taking breaks to rest, walk, and stretch your feet throughout the day

  • Maintaining good foot hygiene - wash and dry your feet thoroughly every day

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Working on Your Feet
Tuesday, 04 January 2022 00:00

The sesamoids are two small, pea-shaped bones located beneath the big toe joint in the ball of the foot. These tiny bones help the big toe with movement. Sesamoiditis occurs when the sesamoids and surrounding tendons are injured or inflamed, usually due to overuse in repetitive running, walking, or jumping activities. Symptoms of sesamoiditis include dull, long-term pain beneath the big toe joint that varies in intensity based on the activities you do and the shoes that you wear. Treatments for sesamoiditis can include padding, strapping, taping, or immobilizing the affected area, as well as taking oral medications or wearing orthotic devices in the shoes to help cushion the feet. If you are experiencing the symptoms of sesamoiditis, it is recommended that you seek the care of a chiropodist. 

Sesamoiditis can be painful and prevent you from participating in certain activities. To learn more about this condition, please consult with Paul A. Scotti, D.Ch from West Toronto Foot & Ankle Clinic Inc. . Our chiropodist will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment. 

What Is Sesamoiditis? 

Sesamoiditis refers to an injury of the sesamoids (two small, pea-shaped bones located beneath the big toe joint) or the tendons and/or surrounding tissue in the joint.

Causes

Sesamoiditis is typically the result of an overuse injury caused by activities that put repetitive pressure on the sesamoid bones and the tendons involved with those bones. These activities can include basketball, football, running, ballet, and tennis. People who have high foot arches and those who frequently wear high-heeled shoes are also at an increased risk of developing sesamoiditis. 

Symptoms

Common symptoms of sesamoiditis include: 

  • Dull, longstanding pain under the big toe joint

  • Swelling

  • Bruising 

  • Difficulty straightening or bending the big toe

  • Pain during movement

Diagnosis

Sesamoiditis can be diagnosed by physical examination and X-rays. Sometimes other imaging studies, such as a bone scan, MRI, or ultrasound may be needed if damage to the area surrounding the sesamoid bones is suspected. 

Treatment

Treatment options include conservative measures, such as padding, strapping, taping or immobilizing the affected foot, taking oral medications or getting steroid injections to reduce pain and swelling, and wearing orthotic devices. Surgical treatment may be necessary if conservative measures are not effective. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Sesamoiditis

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